@

 
   
   
   
   
   
NEWS  
NEWS FEATURES  
INTERVIEWS  
POLITICAL COLUMN  
EDITORIAL  
OPINION  
SPORTS  
CARTOON  
BUSINESS  
EYE - FEATURES  
LETTERS  
EVENTS  
SOUL - YOUTH MAG  
ENTERTAINMENT  
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

 

News


Government in unofficial talks with Tigers

The government is continuously engaged in unofficial dialogue with the LTTE to bring them to the negotiation table and to minimise CFA violations, Presidential sources told ‘The Nation’ yesterday.

"It looks as if the peace groups within the LTTE are weak due to the pressure exerted by the military wing of the LTTE. The military wing believes that the government is trying to drag them into a peace trap more effectively than the Ranil Wickremesinghe administration," he said.

This is the first time that the south has come together, he said adding that President Rajapaksa was able to get all the opposing forces together to take the country forward. "The JHU agreeing for an Indian model is another achievement towards this effort," he said.

He added that the government does not expect the Co-chairs to get involved in banning the LTTE. He said that if this position is pursued it will have a negative effect on the peace process. "The task before the Co-chairs today is to bring peace and to take forward the peace process. The immediate challenge before them is to bring the LTTE back to the negotiation table," he said.

"Incidentally we hope that the EU would take the decision to ban the LTTE after its own assessments. For the first time India, Pakistan and China have expressly supported our peace efforts," he said.

Meanwhile Minister Mangala Samaraweera, Peace secretariat head Palitha Kohona and Treasury Secretary PB Jayasundara are presently in Japan ahead of the Co-chairs meet to present Sri Lanka’s case to obtain an aid package.