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News


JHU to sue UK in ICJ

IPS ex-chairman heads commission

By Santhush Fernando
The Jathika Hela Urumaya (JHU) has appointed a one-man commission to probe into the atrocities allegedly committed by Britain and to see the possibility of prosecuting it in UK courts and in the International Court of Justice.

Former Chairperson of Institute of Policy Studies (IPS) Prof. Buddhadasa Hewawitharana has been appointed as the Chairperson, while the Secretary of the Commission is Attorney-at-Law N.C. Jayarathne. The JHU is hopeful of suing the British Government in its own jurisdiction and in International Court of Justice in the Hague.

Speaking to The Nation, JHU Spokesperson Nishantha Sri Warnasinghe said that the mandate of the Commission was to probe into atrocities committed by British during colonial rule and post-independence periods, and report back within six months.

“The Commission will consider all aspects - destruction to cultural and social heritage, negative impact on our country’s morals and values, destruction of natural resources, especially to our forests and elephant population.” He said.

“Also it will look into giving of undue privileges to minorities and discrimination against the majority, annihilation of Sinhalese especially during 1818 and 1848 insurrections and nourishing separatism through Britain’s ‘divide and rule policy’ in Sri Lanka.

The Commission is tasked to gather both written and oral evidence which will be formulated into the commission report that in turn will support in the forthcoming cases.
“Japan tendered an apology and had to pay millions of dollars as compensation to Korea. So did Germany” Nishantha said.

Japan had paid over US$ 1 trillion to countries occupied during World War II.
JHU expresses its displeasure over the recent appointment of a Special Envoy for Sri Lanka by the British Prime Minister Gordon Brown. This appointment is in contravention of the basic principles governing international relations and the requirement for consultation and reciprocity, it categorically said.

Neither proper procedure nor consultations had been undertaken by the British Government, prior to the said appointment which is time honoured traditions in diplomatic practice, which amounted to interfering into internal affairs and violating territorial integrity of Sri Lanka, JHU alleged.

Furthermore JHU severely criticised British Foreign Secretary, David Miliband’s call on February 4 for a ceasefire. Continuous intrusions into internal affairs of Sri Lanka posed an obstacle in pursuing a sustainable solution to Sri Lanka’s prolonged conflict, it said.

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