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News  


 

ACHSU says national medical institutes sub standard

The All Ceylon Health Services Union (ACHSU) expressed its dissatisfaction with the operation of National Medical Institutes in Sri Lanka. The union argues that the government has failed to maintain most of the specialised medical institutions established to battle specific diseases like cancer, diabetes and cholesterol.
According to the ACHSU chairman, most of the specialised institutes are failing to provide the intended services. “The Kidney Hospital in Maligawatta does not receive enough patients. They spent millions to build that hospital and today only a handful of patients receive its services,” Kumarasinghe said.

According to Kumarasinghe, most of the specialised medical institutes in the country are understaffed.
“There were two lab technicians appointed to the Kidney Hospital but they are still working at the National Hospital. The Cancer Hospital in Maharagama is seriously understaffed. There were complaints about equipment failure there as well.”

Kumarasinghe added that the lack of laboratory facilities has also become a serious problem in hospitals. “Treatment from these government hospitals is free. However, the lack of proper lab facilities forces patients to go out for most of the tests. Some of these tests are highly expensive. Therefore, the whole purpose of free health care is lost,” Kumarasinghe said.

“The establishment of specialised medical institutes to battle chronic diseases is a very good concept. It is being successfully carried out in foreign countries. The Sri Lankan Government has failed to acknowledge their usefulness”.

“Specialised institutes are usually networked together. They share information to find new ways of battling chronic diseases. In Sri Lanka there is no such interaction among hospitals. This is a major drawback in the local concept of specialised institutes.” (IW)