The Nation Sunday Print Edition - page 24-25

insight
i9
insight
i8
The Nation Saturday, April 18, 2015
Festival
of the Panelists,
Presenters and Moderators
Profiles
1030 - 1130 hrs Panel 6 - Tamil Footprint in
Sri Lankan Literature
Panelists:
S Pathmanathan
Dr Kandiah Shriganeshan
Dr Selvy Thiruchandran
Ayathurai Santhan
Moderator:
Gayathree Srikandavel
MEDIUM: TAMIL
1200 - 1300 hrs Panel 7 - Undoing the
Stigma of ‘Broken English’
Towards a Sri Lankan
English Literary Culture
Panelists:
Deepal Sooriyaarachchi
Dilith Jayaweera
Shivanee Ilangakoon
Dr Amarakeerthi Liyanage
Moderator:
Arun Dias Bandaranaike
MEDIUM: SINGLISH
1330 - 1430 hrs Panel 8 - Youth Literature
Poetry of Youth
Panelists:
Saumya Liyanage
Timran Keerthi
Sunanda Karunarathne
Malinda Seneviratne
Moderator:
Dr Amarakeerthi Liyanage
MEDIUM: SINHALA
1500 - 1600 hrs Panel 9 - Women in Sri Lankan
Literature
The Feminine Presence in
Sri Lankan Literature
Panelists:
Manuka Wijesinghe
Rozaine Cooray
Dr Vivimarie Vanderpoorten
Parvathi Arasanayagam
Moderator:
Tissa Jayatilaka
MEDIUM: ENGLISH
Closing ceremony
1700 - 1800 hrs Performance Poetry
Performers:
Samila Widanage
Benny Lau
1000 - 1020 hrs Opening Ceremony
1030 - 1200 hrs Panel 1 - Technological Literature
Blogging in Sri Lanka: A New Platform
for Creativity?
Panelists:
Ajith Parakum Jayasinghe
Yashodha Sammani Premaratne
Abdul Halik Azeez
Moderator:
Nalaka Gunawardane
MEDIUM: SINHALA / ENGLISH
1230 - 1330 hrs Talk 1 - Insights from aWriter’s Creative
Process
Presenters:
Shehan Karunathilake
Dileepa Abeysekera
MEDIUM: SINHALA / ENGLISH
1400 - 1500 hrs Short Film - ‘Butterfly’
A Documentary film [45 minutes] by Vishnu Vasu
Stories of Sri Lankan child soldiers.This
aesthetically shot documentary film has
represented Sri Lanka at many prestigious
film festivals around the globe.
Butterfly
is considered the most poetic war film by a
Sri Lankan director. Stories of child soldiers
woven around poetry and music are so heart
touching, this film demands the viewer to
redefine documentary filmmaking from an
entirely new perspective.
Butterfly
is already screened in USA, Mexico,
Japan, France, Germany
,
South Africa, India,
Nepal, Dubai, Australia and Hong Kong.
MEDIUM: TAMIL / ENGLISH
1530 - 1630 hrs Panel 2 - The Power of Expression
okAk foA
lshkAk lshk foA oefkkAk
Panelists:
Batuwangala Rahula Thera
Piyal Karaiyawasam
Sumithra Rahubadda
Ariyawansa Ranaweera
Moderator
Dhananath Fernando
MEDIUM: SINHALA / ENGLISH
PROGRAM
Hall 1
Hall 2
1100 - 1200 hrs Book Launch
‘Traveler’s Tales - My Journey with
Autism’
Presenter:
Chandima Rajapathirana
Moderator:
Sabina Omar
MEDIUM: ENGLISH
1230 - 1330 hrs Panel 3 - The Gratiaen Forum
Talking Poetry, Prose and Drama
with some GratiaenWinners
Panelists:
Malinda Seneviratne
Lal Medawattegedera
Madhubhashini Dissanayake-
Ratnayake
Special Guest:
Jeanne Thwaites
Moderator:
Dr Harshana Rambukwella
MEDIUM: ENGLISH
1400 - 1500 hrs Panel 4 - Silver-shaded Literature
Writing in Retirement
Panelists:
Bradman Weerakoon
Ananda Liyanage
Lucky de Chickera
Lalitha Somathilaka
Moderator:
Peter D’Almeida
MEDIUM: ENGLISH
1530 - 1630 hrs Panel 5 - Making You aWriter
How to make a start. How to turn
desire into a book or poem.Where
to get help to write
Panelists:
Ramya Jirasinghe
Vihanga Perera
Jean Arasanayagam
Moderator:
Ameena Hussein
MEDIUM: ENGLISH
Hall 3
(Open Hall)
Captain
Elmo’s
(Promethean)
Fire
W
hen did I first here
about
annaasi
(pineapple)? When did
I first see a
kadalagotta
(a paper
cone filled with un-shelled
peanuts)? The answer to both
questions would take me to the
1970s. That’s a childhood thing
for most Sri Lankans. The two
words are not spoken of in the
same breath. Were not, to be
precise. Now they are, thanks
to Capt Elmo Jayawardena,
author and winner of the
Gratiaen Prize 2001 for his
novel
‘Sam’s Story
’ (now a
film).
Elmo knows to mix things the
right way. Elmo knows flavors
that are so ancient that they
are also brand new or can be
reinvented. Elmo also knows
to hide.
The first time I heard of
Annasi
and Kadalagotu
(together) was
when I received an email (widely
and randomly circulated) about
a poetry reading event at Hansa
Café. I associated the event first
with Imaad Majeed and later
with my friend Krishantha Sri
Bhaggiyadatta. I’ve attended this
monthly meetings where poets
share their work with each other
on a few occasions and have been
impressed by the casualness and
freedom. People come, read and
go. There are comments, there
are jokes and there’s coffee. That
would be a description of Elmo
and his ways, come to think of it.
A&K as it is now called is
more than a monthly gathering
of poets, I know now. It is a
small-press publishing house
based in Colombo, focusing
on contemporary Sri Lankan
poetry. They have put out
several volumes of poetry so
far thereby introducing to the
English reading public several
new voices.
And now we have the A&K
Literary Festival. Nothing grand
about it, but it’s everything
that one associates with poetry
and poets. A small community,
passionate and kind, that
celebrates togetherness and
difference without making a song
and dance about it. That’s also
Elmo, by the way.
They have put in a lot of hard
work, this much is clear. If you
just check the featured poets and
critics, they are all well-known
in literary circles and not just
in Colombo. Check the schedule
and there’s bound to be many
events you would be interested in
attending. Forget all that. Just
being around so many people who
obviously love literature is an
experience in itself. That’s what I
would go for, really.
Elmo says it is his swansong
and being alert to the fact that
he’s speaking to a journalist
hastens to add, ‘don’t write that!’
How can a writer ever be ‘done’
with his or her work? Elmo, in
energy and smile, turn of phrase
and twinkle in eye, is as young
as the many young people he is
working with on the A&K thing,
whatever it is and whatever it
will turn out to be. I have only a
cursory and passing knowledge
of these individuals but if first
impressions count, they are all
amazing young people, as soft as
they come but as passionate as
one expects the most passionate
people of that generation to be.
It’s a story in itself, I feel.
Perhaps in time to come
someone will say ‘that was just
the intro’ into what became
the thimbirigeya of many
outstanding writers in the
English language. Perhaps it
would be a different kind of
birthing-place, one where writers
in Sinhala, Tamil and English
learn of commonality and the
enriching that such gatherings
nurture. Let time sort this out.
Right now, let’s just be happy
that Elmo is the man he is. He’s
given us something juicy and
something to munch on. That’s
heavenly in an otherwise mostly
barren literary landscape.
Ananda Liyanage
Ariyawansa Ranaweera
Arun Dias Bandaranaike
Ayathurai Santhan
Batuwangala Rahula
Hamuduruwo
Benny Lau
Bradman Weerakoon
Chandima Rajapatirana
Deen
Deepal Sooriyaarachchi
Dhananath Fernando
Dileepa Abeysekera
Dilith Jayaweera
Gayathree Srikandavel
Harshana Rambukwella
Jean Arasanayagam
Jeanne Thwaites
Kandiah Shriganeshan
Lal Medawattegedara
Lalitha Somathilaka
Lucky de Chickera
Madhubhashini
Dissanayake-Ratnayaka
Malinda Seneviratne
ManukaWijesinghe
Nalaka Gunawardane
Parvathi Arasanayagam Peter D’Almeida
Piyal Kariyawasam
Ramya Chamalie Jirasinghe Rozaine Cooray
Sabina Omar
SamilaWidanage
Saumya Sandaruwan
Liyanage
Selvy Thiruchandran
Shehan Karunathilake
Shivani Ilangakoon
Somasundrampillai
Pathmanathan
Sumithra Rahubadda
Sunanda Karunaratna
Timran Keerthi
Tissa Jayatilaka
Vihanga Perera
Vishnu Vasu
Vivimarie Vanderpoorten
Yashodha Sammani
Premaratne
Abdul Halik Azeez
Ajith Parakum Jayasinghe Amarakeerthi Liyanage
Ameena Hussein
1...,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23 26,27,28,29,30,31,32
Powered by FlippingBook