A 1993 Jaguar XJ220 with just 380 miles on the clock set to sell for £500k

1 month ago 170

We've seen some low mileage classic cars being sold in recent months, but this iconic Jaguar XJ220 might be one of the least-used examples of exotica yet.

The 1993 model, finished in stunning Monza Red paint, is one of just 275 examples of the 213mph British supercar. And if that doesn't make it desirable enough for collectors, a quick glimpse at the odometer shows it has covered a mere 613km - that's just 381 miles from new.

Bonhams, which is auctioning the barely-used Jaguar at this weekend's Goodwood Revival sale says it should sell for up to half a million pounds. But experts say its combination of rarity and ultra-low mileage could spark a bidding frenzy and a sale price well above the higher estimate.

The barely-driven British supercar: This 1993 Jaguar XJ220 - one of just 275 examples ever produced - has covered only 381 miles from new. It is being sold by Bonhams this weekend, and is estimated to reach half a million pounds

The 28-year-old XJ220 has never actually been registered in the UK, having originally been delivered to Germany. That means it's a left-hand-drive model, which could slightly impact its value for those with deep pockets looking to add it to their vintage vehicle hauls.

On its arrival, the first keeper immediately placed the car into dehumidified storage along with the rest of his automobile collection, where it has remained for the vast majority of its life.

The original owner, a Mr Woo Yung Tae - who had the motor delivered to his company Primrose International - even employed a former Ferrari-trained mechanic to ensure his fleet of expensive motors remained in the optimum condition and working order, while a German Jaguar dealer carried out its only service on 13 June 1994.

At the time, it had 388 kilometres (241 miles) on the odometer. That means it has covered just 225 kilometres (140 miles) in the last 27 years.  

The 1993 example of Jaguar's supercar will be available at the Bonhams Goodwood Revival auction, which takes place in Chichester on Saturday

As this picture of the odometer shows, it has racked up only 613 kilometres from new. That's 381 miles. It had its one and only service in June 1994. At the time it had 388 kilometres (241 miles) on the odometer. That means it has covered just 225 kilometres (140 miles) in the last 27 years

The XJ220 remains today the fastest production car Jaguar has ever sold to customers, with a recorded top speed of 213mph

The current owner acquired the car from the original collection through an intermediary in October 2015, and has maintained it in their own significant collection since. 

It was appropriately taxed upon its entry into the UK, but while an application was submitted to register the car, the process was never completed and the vehicle remains never registered since new – surely one of the last XJ220s that can make such a claim. 

The vendor in 2019 had the Jaguar recommissioned by Don Law Racing, which has become the specialist British firm dealing with the retro supercar. 

All receipts - totalling £35,000 - from the work are included in the sale, as is the original tool kit, car cover, handbooks in their leather wallets, wheel socket, and rear left- and right- wing mouldings for use during servicing. 

Constructed using advanced aluminium honeycomb, the car was immensely strong and, despite its size, weighed just 1,470kg - that's around the same as today's Vauxhall Corsa supermini

Bonhams says it is 'undoubtedly one of the lowest-mileage, freshest and best-prepared XJ220s available on the market, now available for registration for the first time in its life'

The esteemed automotive auctioneer describes it as being in 'virtually pristine cosmetic order' with its Monza Red paint and the Sand leather interior in 'superb condition'

Bonhams says the XJ220 remains in 'virtually pristine cosmetic order'.

It says its paint has been 'corrected' and the Sand leather interior is in 'superb condition'.

'This is undoubtedly one of the lowest-mileage, freshest and best-prepared XJ220s available on the market, now available for registration for the first time in its life,' the auction house concluded.

Bonhams says its expects the car to sell for between £400,000 and £500,000 when the hammer eventually drops at the Goodwood Revival classic car event in Chichester on Saturday - though experts suggest it come make more than that.

Classic car valuations experts say a 'concours' example (one in such good order that it could be displayed in a museum) is today worth up to £415,000. However, the ultra-low mileage on this example means it could blow that figure out of the water

The first XJ220 was built in 1992 with a retail price of £470,000 new. Production ceased in 1994, by which time 275 cars had been built

'The XJ220 is a very difficult car to value,' explains John Mayhead from classic car insurance and valuations provider, Hagerty. 

It estimates that a 'concours' condition version - which means it is good enough to be displayed in a museum - is worth £415,000, which is quite some way below the Bonhams higher estimate. That said, its provenance could see it eclipse all these quoted prices.

'The top recent sale we have tracked at auction was £414,000 back in 2019 at the Bonhams Goodwood Festival of Speed sale,' Mayhead told us.

'More recently, results have been mixed: one offered by Silverstone Auctions back in July failed to sell at an estimate of £340,000 to £380,000. Three others offered at UK public auction since last summer did sell, two under low estimate (one selling for £292,500 and another £210,000) and one just scraped into the expected zone.

'That said, the mileage of this example puts it into a category all of its own. Hagerty has often seen extremely low mileage cars sell for more than expected, and although the market’s views on the XJ220 are mixed, this could be the car that breaks the mould.'

The XJ220 debuted at the 1988 British Motor Show. Designed by Keith Helfet, the vehicle on display was featured a host of complex engineering feats, including four-wheel drive, rear-wheel steering, adjustable suspension and active aerodynamics as well as a booming 6.2-litre V12 engine but by the time production came around that had shrunk to a V6

However, the version signed off for production in December 1989 - with Tom Walkinshaw Racing selected as the partner for the project - was somewhat different to the British Motor Show concept shown a year earlier. Even with half the number of cylinders, it could outsprint a Ferrari F40 and Lamborghini Diablo

The XJ220 remains today the fastest production car Jaguar has ever sold to customers, with a recorded top speed of 213mph. 

Constructed using advanced aluminium honeycomb, the car was immensely strong and, despite its size, weighed just 1,470kg - that's around the same as today's Vauxhall Corsa supermini.

Originally conceived as a concept car, the XJ220 debuted at the 1988 British Motor Show. Designed by Keith Helfet, the vehicle on display was featured a host of complex engineering feats, including four-wheel drive, rear-wheel steering, adjustable suspension and active aerodynamics as well as a booming 6.2-litre V12 engine.

Its design and specs were enough to make the most well-heeled petrolheads salivate, with some putting down £50,000 deposits for the svelte supercar.

The vendor acquired the car from the original collector in Germany in 2015. It was appropriately taxed upon its entry into the UK, but while an application was submitted to register the car, the process was never completed and the vehicles remains never registered since new – surely one of the last XJ220s that can make such a claim

However, the version signed off for production in December 1989 - with Tom Walkinshaw Racing selected as the partner for the project - was somewhat different to the British Motor Show concept shown a year earlier.

The rear-wheel drive XJ220 did away with a V12 and Jaguar instead installed a 3.5-litre twin-turbocharged V6.

It developed 550 horsepower and 475 pounds-foot of torque and the XJ220 was recorded accelerating from zero to 60mph in under four seconds - quicker than the Ferrari F40 and Lamborghini Diablo, which were the poster supercars of the generation.

The first customer car was completed in June 1992 with a retail price of £470,000 and production ceased in 1994, by which time 275 cars had been built. 

Five other British motors being sold by Bonhams this weekend that could cause a bidding stir 

1956/1980s Jaguar D-type

Estimate: £900,000 – £1.2million

This Jaguar D-type is being sold with a higher estimate of £1.2million. That's a fraction of the price paid for the most expensive of D-Type all time, which was £16.64million paid in 2016. However, this is a completed car broken down into parts to be shared across Jaguar Works racers. It was then rebuilt from its original components in the 1980s

A Jaguar D-type for around a million pounds sounds like an absolute steal today, with the most expensive iteration of the fifties racer selling for £16.64million in 2016 - though that was a Le Mans-winning example.

The car being sold has what Bonhams describes as an 'interrupted early provenance'. That's because XKD 570 was built in 1956 as a completely assembled and finished model but was then dismantled for parts by Jaguar soon after. 

It effectively disappeared until the 1980s when the components were pieced back together - or 'coalesced' into a single car, as Bonhams describes it. That includes its engine, which was used in one of three Jaguar Works entries prepared for Le Mans in 1954, driven by Stirling Moss and Peter Walker and set the fastest time in practice for the race. However, an engine misfire and brake failure meant it was retired from the lead of the endurance race after 92 laps. 

Due to its gapped history, the estimate value is a fraction of what D-types are usually valued at, which could make it all the more appealing for buyers. 

1962 Brabham-Climax BT3/4 Prototype

Estimate: £300,000 – £400,000

Both Jack Brabham and Graham Hill - who have a combined five Formula One world titles to their name - drove this Brabham-Climax BT3/4 Prototype in the sixties. The £400k higher estimate could be appealing for competition car fanatics

It's rare for a racing car driven by two legends to be made available to the public, but that's the case for this sixties single-seater.

It was built for use by its then two-time - later three-time - Formula 1 world champion driver and subsequent two-time Formula 1 World Champion constructor Jack Brabham in the 1962 Australian Grand Prix run at Caversham aerodrome near Perth, in Western Australia.

It was later sold to Australian-based racing driver David McKay for his budding Scuderia Veloce team and in 1964 was piloted by 1962 Formula 1 world champion, Graham Hill, who was offered the seat during the off-season break. The Londoner brought it home in fourth place at Warwick Farm, Sydney,  before taking a win and second place at Longford, Tasmania. Hill went on to win his second Monaco Grand Prix with BRM after driving this Brabham down under.

The car has recently spent two years being restored from the ground up, with all bills for the work undertaken by Tony Ditheridge's highly-respected Hawker Racing concern of Milden, Suffolk. Bonhams says it could sell for up to £400,000.

1960 Bristol 406 Zagato

Estimate: £140,000 – £180,000

Only six examples of the Bristol 406 received the coachwork treatment of legendary motor designer, Carrozzeria Zagato. Just five of those remain today, with this being one of them. Bonhams expect it to sell this weekend for around £150,000

Italian design met British engineering in the late 1950s, when Carrozzeria Zagato was commissioned by Bristol to build a series of lightweight four-seater motor cars based on its 406 saloon. 

This example was one of only six completed and one of the five that remain. 

Given its rarity, Bonhams says it could sell for up to £180,000 during Saturday's auction. 

Some links in this article may be affiliate links. If you click on them we may earn a small commission. That helps us fund This Is Money, and keep it free to use. We do not write articles to promote products. We do not allow any commercial relationship to affect our editorial independence.

Read Entire Article
x